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Sumatra Orangutan Discovery

Bukit Lawang, Sumatra

 

 

Whatsapp +62 81375987779

sumatraorangutandiscovery@gmail.com

©2019 by Sumatra Orangutan Discovery

Rafflesia Flower Trek

48 Euros per pax
No Minimum person requirement 
Intensity level: Easy/ Medium

Start time: 08.30 from Bukit Lawang 

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Starting from Bukit Lawang we will travel to the remote eco-tourism village of Batu Katat, located 18km away at the border of the national park.  Batu Katak is a small village bordering the Gunung Leuser National Park. It consists of small typical wooden houses nestled along the Berkail River.

The surrounding area consists of some rubber and palm plantations, but the most important and interesting feature are the karst forests; towering limestone rock cliffs and cave systems. Protecting these forests is incredibly important for wildlife, as they are home to the Black Gibbon, White-handed Gibbon, Hornbill, and the Sumatran Orangutan.

It is also home to two of the worlds most unusual lowers- the Rafflesia Arnoldi and the The Amorphophallus titanum aka Corpse Flower. 

In Indonesia, its name "bunga bangkai" translates to Corpse Flower. This Flower is endemic to Western Java, Central and North Sumatra. The flower is rare to see, until 1989, fewer than 30 flowerings were recorded to have occurred in botanical gardens worldwide. 

The Amorphophallus titanum

In Indonesia, its name "bunga bangkai" translates to Corpse Flower. This Flower is endemic to Western Java, Central and North Sumatra. The flower is rare to see, until 1989, fewer than 30 flowerings were recorded worldwide. It is the tallest recorded flower, measuring 3 meters when fully grown.

Rafflesia Arnoldi 

Commonly refered to as the 'Corpse Lily'  this flower is the largest individual flower on Earth. It i a very are flower, but can be found growing in the forests aurroundin Batu Katak. These flowers can take months to develop but only last a few days, so it is a really fortunate to be able to see them in North Sumatra. 

 

  

Supporting the community of Batu Katak and their eco-conscious treks to see the flower is vitally important. This remote village is very poor, and without the support of tourism, the villagers reply on palm oil, poaching, illegal logging and other unsustainable forms of income. In addition, the limestone cliffs are under threat of mining from cement companies which would have a devestating effect on the wildlife that thrive in the forests.

Contact us for more information on how you can support this community, or to take part in a seasonal flower trek.